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Biography

Lauren obtained her J.D. from the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University in 2011. She also received a B.Sc. in Earth Sciences from the University of Calgary in 2008. Lauren commenced her legal career with a firm in Halifax and was called to the Nova Scotia Bar in 2012. She continued to practice in Halifax until she joined Carbert Waite LLP as an associate in 2014.

Lauren’s current practice is in general civil litigation, with a focus on employment, human rights, and health law. She regularly advises both employees and employers on human rights issues and on all aspects of employment, including terminations of employment, harassment, disability issues, workplace policies, employment standards, disciplinary issues, and occupational health and safety issues.

Lauren has appeared before the Federal Court of Appeal and all levels of courts in Alberta, as well as before the courts in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.  She has represented clients in collective bargaining, before labour boards, and at arbitrations, conciliations, and mediations.  Lauren also has experience in matters related to labour law, professional regulations, administrative law, and pension/benefits law.

Education

  • Schulich School of Law,
    Dalhousie University (J.D., 2011)
  • University of Calgary
    (B. Sc., 2008)

Professional Memberships

  • Law Society of Alberta (2014)
  • Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society (2012 – 2014)
  • Canadian Bar Association
  • Calgary Bar Association

#Metoo Has Come to my Workplace, Now What Do We Do?

September 10, 2019

Allegations of sexual harassment are serious and employers should investigate them promptly. Even when no specific complaint has been made, but there has been gossip or murmurings of inappropriate behaviour, employers should probe the issue and not wait for a formal complaint.

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Federally Regulated Employers Be Cautious

January 5, 2017

In Wilson v. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.[1] the Supreme Court of Canada provided a critical clarification to the “unjust dismissal” provisions in the Canada Labour Code (the “Code”).[2] The Court ruled that the Code prohibits federally regulated businesses and organizations from dismissing most non-unionized employees without cause subject to…

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Unilateral Changes to Employment Contracts

May 20, 2016

Your employer has laid off many of your colleagues; but not you. Instead, your employer informs you that it is cutting your pay, increasing your hours, or changing your job duties. What options do you have?

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Navigating the Complexities of an Employment Termination

July 17, 2015

In the past few months, we have heard many stories of both large and small companies located in Alberta laying off substantial numbers of employees. In this uncertain environment, it is essential that both employees and employers alike understand the legal principles surrounding employment terminations. Failing to do so may…

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Mental Illness in the Workplace: Legal Issues, Pre-emptive Solutions

May 27, 2015

here are various forms of mental health concerns ranging from mild depression and anxiety to severe depression and anxiety, bi-polar disorder or schizophrenia. Why is mental health in the workplace an issue?

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Update on the Law of Constructive Dismissal

April 22, 2015

On March 6, 2015 the Supreme Court of Canada released its reasons for judgment in Potter v. New Brunswick (Legal Aid Services Commission), 2015 SCC 10. In it, the Court clarified the law on constructive dismissal for the first time since Farber v. Royal Trust Co., [1997] 1 S.C.R. 846.

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